We should remember David Katz for how he lived, not just his one indiscretion

In the wake of the death of David Katz, the young man known for his actions at a Jacksonville video game convention on August 26, there has been a head of steam building to condemn the young man.

However, this is not the time to condemn Katz, but instead to celebrate his life and all of the good that he did.

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Some are quick to jump to the “Katz’s actions lead to death and harm to others” boat and ferry their way onto an island of dark pessimist-types who see Katz only as a “mass shooter.” Instead, we should be thanking him for the life he offered us for years before any such incident occurred.

Take, for example, David’s years of service to the gaming industry. There is every indication that he was a valuable customer in this technology field which serves as an important economic driver. It’s also understood that David was very good at video games — perhaps not the best, but very good — and there is nothing to indicate that regular (wink wink), controlled exposure to onscreen violence (nudge nudge) has any effect on the emotional state or world view of it’s sometimes fragile consumers.

Also, remember his more heroic and better-guided action on August 26 when Katz — a good guy with a gun — used his firearm to end a mass shooting spree in Jacksonville, using masterful marksmanship certainly learned through hours of “Duck Hunt” to kill the shooter with a single shot to the head. There’s no way of knowing how many lives he saved that day.

Are we really that thoughtless, self-centered, and disillusioned as a society? Are we really this sold on the idea that bad news sells better than good?

There will be plenty of time to talk about the alleged harm some of Katz’ other actions might have caused, but for now it is important to remember him as the semi-useful, oxygen-consuming human being his acquaintances remember him being. After all, Mr. Katz had a family whom I am certain loved him before the whole shooting thing occurred, and I am certain that they would appreciate this time to lovingly appreciate the sweet baby boy who once cooed and giggled peacefully in their arms. It wouldn’t be prudent to cause his family any grief in this moment when they so desperately seek solace, and that’s exactly what hate speech about his one indiscretion will prevent.

It’s best to let sleeping dogs lie and let the history books separate the good and the bad way, way in the future. It’s in retrospect that we better view individuals, grasp their values, and judge them for intent and results. If we’re so great at judging others during their lives, nothing bad would ever happen, now would it?

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Study: Condemning “thoughts and prayers” equally as effective as sending thoughts and prayers after a tragedy

To the dismay of American theists, a new study confirms that the emergence of bitterness and sarcasm towards people who send thoughts and prayers after a tragic event has proven an effective replacement for the passive “thoughts and prayers” movement it supplanted.
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Crisis experts from Tranpower, a scientific think tank in San Bernardino, confirmed the findings of their 2-year social media study at a conference in Los Angeles on Friday. The study showed that complaining about people who send thoughts and prayers has an equal physical effect on “rectifying acts universally considered horrible by people of any political persuasion”.
“Physical results matter, and we found that the effect achieved by condemning people sending thoughts and prayers is not only equal to the physical effect of sending thoughts and prayers, but we also failed to find evidence supportive of the notion that such persistent condemnation has not always produced an equal effect,” reported Julia Stibber, a spokesperson from Tranpower.
“Instead of just feeling insulted like they were in the past, this new method of helping those in need offers particular feelings of pride and smarm to those who spread such condemnation, positive feelings that these people might never have felt before in similar situations.”
“It speaks to the powers of science — and to some extent pessimism — being the building block of society, not religion” Stibber concluded.
The conference room was abuzz after the Tranpower presentation.
“Nothing says you’re only thinking about yourself like sending thoughts and prayers,” said conference attendee Rosa Phillips, whose philanthropic ventures to date have been limited to posting continuous opinions online while garnering no considerable influence. “Just save it, they don’t need need or want to know that the community is offering love and strength during their time of need.”
“I just wish religious people realized how big of assholes they can be,” stated Bill Sederhill, a woman’s studies major from UCLA. “You have to be pretty stupid to think that thoughts and prayers are fixing anything, and I am more than glad to express my disgust with these people after a tragedy. Even if I haven’t personally heard anyone offer thoughts and prayers, you just know they’re out there, thinking, praying. It’s our shared responsibility to cut them off and to set up a partition wall between those imaginary thoughts and prayers and their target and meet them with some very real pessimism.”

YouTube Video Debunking a YouTube Shooting Debunking Video Debunked by YouTube Debunker

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A viral YouTube video debunking another viral YouTube video which debunked an earlier claim that debunked this week’s shooting of three people at YouTube headquarters in San Bruno as a “false flag” has began circulating among internet conspiracy and debunker channels.
The YouTube video, entitled “Debunked! Of Course It’s a False Flag! This A-Hole Has No Idea What He Is Talking About!” was purportedly released to debunk a YouTube video’s claim that Youtube shooter Nasim Najafi Aghdam, who killed herself after wounding three YouTube employees, was a YouTube content generator who was disgruntled over what she believed to be biases in YouTube promotion instead of an operative in a false flag operation designed to create more censorship on the internet.
The YouTube debunker who posted the video, who refers to himself as “Mark”, claimed to hold evidence that Aghdam was “brainwashed into a way of thinking by powers who saw her as prone to persuasion” and whose “lone goal is to silence voices of dissent on social media channels.” He says his video debunks the previous debunking video thoroughly, and insists that more consideration should be given to the initial debunking video, “False Flag! YouTube Shooting was Staged to Push For More Internet Censorship!” which debunked the YouTube shooting as a false flag, which he claims was not effectively debunked by the debunking video that purported to debunk those claims.
Mark offered a “personal guarantee” that videos that dissented from mainstream opinion would slowly be removed from the video network, soon to be followed by numerous other outlets who rely upon video advertising for profits. Mark also guaranteed that “the Jews are clearly behind this” and that the previous debunker was “probably a faggot or something.”
Mark’s video debunking the previous debunker’s debunking video can be seen by clicking here.

TV, video games, chatting online: inside the sick habits of the Florida gunman who “showed all the warning signs”

Serial television. Video games. Chatting with friends on Facebook. These and other habits are among the early warning signs that friends and acquaintances of accused gunman Nikolas Cruz report the troubled teen displayed before his February rampage at a Florida high school that left 17 dead and scores injured.
One neighbor, who encountered Cruz frequently in the last months before the shooting, said that Cruz mostly kept to himself.
“I’d be like, ‘hey, what are you up to’, and he’d be like ‘oh, I’m just going to go play some games’ or ‘I’m going to chat with some friends on Facebook’. He apparently really liked gaming and hanging out on the internet.”
“He really gave me the vibe that he spent as much time talking to people on virtual platforms as he did trying to engage them face-to-face.”
“He was really into some shows, he’d talk about that from time to time,” another neighbor revealed, pointing to Cruz’s interest in serial television. “I remember Game of Thrones and Walking Dead, those A&E and HBO type shows. I don’t know if he was into Netflix or not, but all things considered, I wouldn’t put it past him.”
“It was like TV was more important to him than having real friends,” the neighbor conveyed.”I get the feeling that he felt a little lonely sometimes. He was just filling his life with, you know, stuff. TV, computer devices, possessions, little trinkets, knives and things that brought him moments of joy, but nothing that really filled the void he was creating by not engaging others on a regular, healthy basis.”
Dr. Randall Kirger, Director of Sapphic Studies and adolescent psychology professor at Culvert Community College points to isolationism as a leading indicator of the type of emotional distress that leads teens into bouts of rage.
“This young man showed all the warning signs. People who watch a lot of television or Netflix, people who look at porn, people who spend a lot of time on their electronic devices or in the digital world in general, gamers, people who look at pictures of baby animals for comfort, these are the people who’ve isolated themselves so that they can create an illusion of control in all of their interpersonal activities. It creates a potent emotional cocktail, and those peopleĀ  need to be on our radar.”
“Have you ever walked past someone and said “hello” and they never looked up from their phone or their tablet, never acknowledged that they had been spoken to at all? That person has blurred the line between fantasy and reality. That’s the person who could snap at any minute, and that’s when you need to say something. Call the police. Get that person some help,” Kirger instructed.

This time, America focused and ready to dig in on gun contro — oh hey! Did you see that baseball spring training just started?

Time-wearied Americans are ready to dig in and re-open the gun control debate in the days following yet another tragic mass shooting, this time in Florida, less than an hour away from where Spring Training baseball is teeing up for the 2018 season.
This shooting occurred in a high school in Parkland, just 45 minutes from the Astros and Nationals’ shared facility in West Palm Beach, where pitchers and catcher have already reported for spring warm-ups, and where Bryce Harper will soon dust off his winter bones and send his first rifle shots of the new baseball season over The Ballpark’s right-center field fence.
Many Americans feel like this the gun control debate is conversation that has to be had. People are entrusting their neighbors to join them in deciding what types of firearms should be available and who should have them. Heavy with the question is the weight of yet another seventeen lives, many of them younger people just on the cusp of breaking out like the New York phenom Aaron Judge, whose quest to bury blast after monstrous blast into the seats of Yankee Stadium begins this week in Tampa, where hope for a 28th championship for the familiar Bronx squad springs anew.
But the atmosphere seems different this time, as Americans seem to have a collective resolve to step into the box, dig in their cleats, tap the bat on the plate, smell the fresh Florida spring air and face off against some kid who sent last season in the bullpen at Pawtucket.
Following a rigorous spring schedule, active rosters will pare down to 25 for Opening Day, March 29.

Developing: disgruntled firearm opens fire in Florida classroom

A firearm attending class today at a high school in Florida became aggravated and opened fire on classmates and faculty.
At the time of this writing, it is unclear how many persons were injured, although local officials have named it a “Class 3 Casualty Event”. A Class 3 event indicates mass casualties, indicating more than 20 were wounded by the disgruntled firearm.
“We’ve attempted to ban guns on the premises before, and we thought we were very clear on that, but they keep finding their way onto the campus,” said one school representative. “You’d think someone in administration would be making better checks before seating them in our classrooms.”
The firearm was reported to be in police custody shortly after 4pm local time. Police have yet to establish a motive for what triggered the firearm, who other students report was was usually quiet and complacent in the classroom setting.